Bleaching Denim

Denim Jacket Bleached Sleeves


Denim Jacket - Hand-made (East London Style).

Denim Jacket - Hand-made (East London Style).

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This is a super simple update for your denim jacket. Any denim jacket will do, new, old, stretch, any. 

Simply take you jacket and using parcel tape, place a cross the sleeve to create a line to which the bleach won't pass. Do this to both sleeves equally and then place the sleeves into a bucket, sink (anything that you are happy to put bleach into). 

Pour the bleach onto the sleeves up to the of the tape. 

Leave for a good hour, up to two hours as you don't want the fabric to break down. 

Remove the tape and wash. If possible air dry outside ☀️.

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How To - Bleach A Jacket


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Evidently denim jackets are set to be big - in style, shape and fashion this coming spring. I have already been working on a few ideas over the last few months, mainly involving sewing and reworking old denim jackets that people have discarded for various reasons - holes, missing buttons, rips. 

But I had a quick idea last week with involves no sewing and is a quick and easy way to get the current trend of re-working denim - simply fake it - with bleach. 

💙All that is needed is a denim jacket, house hold bleach (I always use cheap and cheerful) and some masking tape. 💙

 Simply place the masking tape down the back of the jacket so that the edge of the tape is the in the centre.

Place over a sink as below and add bleach. Leave for up to an hour.

Take the tape off and then put into the washing machine with detergent on a 40 degree wash. 

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Bleach & Over-Dye Jeans


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Coloured denim is set to be a huge trend this summer. Inspired by the sunny yellow of the daffodils, plus the fact I found some yellow Dylon dye in the back of the washing cupboard - waste not want not, and all that ...

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I simply choice a pair of jeans for myself and a pair for Lyric. Both pairs are going to be 'made to measure' or 'bespoke' i.e I am going to tailor them to fit us, so it didn't really matter on the size. What mattered most, was the level of  blue dye in the jeans. The jeans needed to be a medium blue so that we could strip the colour with bleach without destroying the fabric. 

Quick note - I like to leave clothes or fabric in bleach for up to an 1 hour maximum. 

I left the tops of the jeans out of the sink and away from the bleach. This enabled me to see how much dye was stripped away - and plus I liked the effect of leaving the waistband untouched. 

I put the jeans in our utility sink (you can use a bucket too) and poured cheap non branded bleach on to the denim. Leaving it on the denim for 45 minutes. 

Then I washed the jeans on a 40 degree wash with washing powder.

They were then left to dry.

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All that was left to do was to put the jeans back into the washing machine when dry. Add the Dylon washing machine powder (I use the pods which contain everything needed to dye and fix the dye). I put them back onto a 40 degree wash and then hung them over a radiator to dry.

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As you can see my jeans came out brighter and Lyrics came out darker and slightly patchy - which when we did a family  - we all preferred! 

The beauty of bleaching and over dying is the outcome can be slightly unpredictable but this can also be fun.

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